The Utah Foodie Reheated: Utah's Coffee Journey

The Utah Foodie Reheated: Utah's Coffee Journey

Birds chirping. The sun shining warm and bright. People outside, enjoying these summer months in the great Utah outdoors. Playing Pokemon Go to their hearts content. Summer is a magical time. Which is why we’re spending our “Summer Vacation” in the studio, putting together an exciting series that we think you’ll enjoy. While we’ll always stick with our Utah Foodie format of sitting down with incredible entrepreneurs for interviews and stories, we wanted to introduce a new series called “Utah Foodie Reheated.” These topic focused, produced episodes are an opportunity to focus in on a subject in Utah that deserves a spotlight.

#57: Mollie & Ollie – Healthy Eating... On The Fly

#57: Mollie & Ollie – Healthy Eating... On The Fly

We’re incredibly proud of the growing food scene in Utah, and are constantly amazed by the innovators, dreamers, and eaters who are shaping the future of our state’s culinary landscape. We’re always excited to invite brand new restaurants onto the show to help you discover the hidden gems around the state.

#56 – Project Pineapple: Vacation In A Pineapple

#56 – Project Pineapple: Vacation In A Pineapple

While Utah is known for its premier snow, many people don’t quite realize is that the majority of the state is a desert. Which means it gets hot. Really hot. And while we find ways to enjoy the warm and sunny days, the need for a cold treat is frequent. And as the saying goes, when you stumble upon a lemonade stand, put shaved ice in a pineapple.

#55: Mama Africa – Smell It, Taste It, Love It

#55: Mama Africa – Smell It, Taste It, Love It

The world is full of beautiful locations, delicious food, and histories that shapes entire cultures. While we can all dream of visiting exotic locations, money and time are very real restraints. Which is a bummer. How do we experience new places and different lifestyles if we can’t afford to do so? That’s where food comes in.

#54: Handle + HSL – Appreciate Tradition

#54: Handle + HSL – Appreciate Tradition

When you interview over 50 different food, coffee, and beverage entrepreneurs over a year, you begin to notice certain trends. They’re all passionate about their craft, feel a calling to create, and want to contribute to a growing community. The aspiration to put Utah on the foodie map can be found in ways big and small. For Briar Handly, the co-owner of Handle and HSL, developing a hyper-local, hyper-seasonal restaurant was one way to help Utah take one giant step forward.

#53: Butcher's Bunches – It's All About Family

#53: Butcher's Bunches – It's All About Family

When the recession arrived in 2008 the pain was felt everywhere. Fortune 500 companies, local mom and pop shops, and governments around the world all slowed down and the cost of living made margins thinner and thinner. For Liz Butcher and the Butcher family, their farmer’s market side business felt a massive crunch. As more people joined the markets to sell produce, Liz began brainstorming alternatives. And what she dreamed up was even bigger than the family's produce business.

#52: Publik Coffee Roasters – Good Coffee, Great Community

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Third wave coffee has arrived in Salt Lake City, and it shows no signs of slowing down. With a focus on local roasting, high-quality beans, and deep and layered flavor, coffee has become more than a reheated pot of Folgers.

One of the most prominent leaders for the third wave coffee revolution is Publik Coffee. The word “Publik” is derived from the Dutch word “Community,” and the feeling of community can be found in every chair, barista, and warm piece of toast. Publik’s dedication to creating a community for coffee lovers of all backgrounds has led to an accelerated expansion into The Avenues and Ninth & Ninth.

On this week’s episode of The Utah Foodie we sit down with Alicia Pacheco, Head Chef of Publik Kitchen, Dylan Sands, Director of Coffee, and Ryan Gee, the Head Roaster of Publik Coffee Roasters. These three have helped execute the mission and vision of Missy Greis, who opened Publik’s doors in 2014. Their commitment to the community extends further than just providing a space for people to gather and collaborate. With a dedication to green energy, local partnerships, and creating a lasting relationship with established neighborhoods.

Join us as we sit down with Alicia, Dylan and Gee, and get an inside look into the history of Publik Coffee Roasters!

This episode was sponsored by…

90.9FM KRCL — Community Connection and Music Discovery

Vive Juicery — A Utah-based cold-pressed juicery

The Chocolate Conspiracy — A project in pure, raw, honey-sweetened chocolate.

Blue Copper Coffee — Specialty coffee hand-roasted in Salt Lake City, with a coffee room at 179 W 900 S.

The Yelp Elite Squad — Utah’s five-star fan club of all things local.

This episode was hosted by Chase Murdock and produced by Ryan Samanka. For more information or to browse our episode archive, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on Facebook,Instagram, or Twitter. See you next week!

#51: Taqueria 27 – It's Not Mexican, It's Mexicanish

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Many people spend their entire professional careers attempting to find their calling. Dreams are dreamt, but never realized. For Todd and Kristin Gardiner, the founders and owners of Taqueria 27, finding their calling was as simple as waking up in the morning.

Todd has been working in the food industry for over 30 years.While he initially began his career as an ambitious 12-year-old busboy, working to afford to go bird hunting with his grandfather, Todd quickly was drawn in by the fast-paced, creative environment of the kitchen. For years, Todd worked his way up through various restaurants, and at a very young age found himself as the sous chef of Log Haven.

It was at Log Haven that Todd and Kristin met, and their true journey began. After years of working at Log Haven, Snowbird, and Z’Tejas, Todd’s dream of opening a restaurant was finally within reach. Taqueria 27 was born. Their original location on Foothill Drive opened in 2012, and in four short years, two more locations have followed suit.

Todd and Kristin had no interest in opening a traditional Mexican restaurant. They saw tacos as the perfect platform to play with creative and inventive combinations, and they wanted to challenge Utahns’ expectations of what a taco could be. It wasn’t Mexican food, it was “Mexicanish.” Several locations, tequilas, and awards later, Taqueria 27 is a flourishing local establishment that has become a favorite to eaters in the Salt Lake Valley. Join us as we sit down with Todd and Kristin and explore the winding, yet focused path they took to bring Taqueria 27 to the world.

 

This episode was sponsored by…

90.9FM KRCL — Community Connection and Music Discovery

Vive Juicery — A Utah-based cold-pressed juicery

The Chocolate Conspiracy — A project in pure, raw, honey-sweetened chocolate.

Blue Copper Coffee — Specialty coffee hand-roasted in Salt Lake City, with a coffee room at 179 W 900 S.

The Yelp Elite Squad — Utah’s five-star fan club of all things local.

This episode was hosted by Chase Murdock and produced by Ryan Samanka. For more information or to browse our episode archive, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. See you next week!

#50: Chedda Burger – Give It Your All, Or Don't Even Try

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One week we're celebrating our one year anniversary, the next, we air our 50th episode! When we launched The Utah Foodie our goal was to create a podcast that dove headfirst into the stories of the creators and innovators in Utah's food scene. Every week we've walked away from our interviews full of inspiration and appreciation. This episode, however, truly highlights how important it is to share these emotional and authentic stories.

When Nick Watts founded Chedda Truck, it was more of an online concept than a real company. Working multiple jobs and needing a creative outlet, Nick would stop by the farmers market during his free time to find the perfect ingredients for his homemade grilled cheese creations. His Chedda Truck Twitter account began to grow, and in a moment of generosity, a friend who owned a tattoo parlor offered him an evening to bring his grilled cheese out into the world for some of his customers.

What began as a low-key offer blew up into a frenzy as news of this grilled cheese launch began to spread through popular food blogs and Twitter accounts. Nick originally anticipated a small crowd, but over 250 customers and grilled cheese sandwiches later, it was apparent that this was more than just a casual evening.

And yet, Nick didn't open his food truck for another six months after his initial launch. After soul searching and working a mind numbing job, Nick knew a drastic change was needed. Hence, Chedda Truck became officially official.

What followed his launch was years of lessons learned, generous friends and strangers, and a full-time investment into Chedda Truck and Chedda Burger that was purely driven out of passion and an unwillingness to give up. With a physical location at 26 E 600 S and two food trucks, Nick's ambition and creativity are inspiring, and he offers wisdom and passion that is infectious.

 

This episode was sponsored by...

90.9FM KRCL -- Community Connection and Music Discovery

Vive Juicery -- A Utah-based cold-pressed juicery 

The Chocolate Conspiracy -- A project in pure, raw, honey-sweetened chocolate.

Blue Copper Coffee -- Specialty coffee hand-roasted in Salt Lake City, with a coffee room at 179 W 900 S.

The Yelp Elite Squad, Utah's five-star fan club of all things local.

--

This episode was hosted by Chase Murdock and produced by Ryan Samanka. For more information or to browse our episode archive, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter. See you next week! 

#49: Beehive Distilling – Gin As The Medium, Utah As The Canvas

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The Utah Foodie has reached our one year anniversary, and to be honest, we’re a little blown away. It feels like yesterday when we sat down with our first guests from Whiskey Street and Forage, and we dove headfirst into the thriving and inspiring Utah food scene.

While we often focus on the entrepreneurial spirit and passion that these small business owners have, something that is not always obvious is their overflowing creativity. Whether it’s a unique take on a traditional dish, finding local partners that have the same vision, or even deciding on the look and color of a jam, a lot of energy is put into creating art in the form of food or beverages.

This creativity is especially apparent at Beehive Distilling, one of the first four distilleries in Utah. Founded by Chris Barlow, Erik Ostling, and Matt Aller, Beehive Distilling originally began as a fun idea that was discussed amongst these three friends. But once the idea was in Erik’s mind, he couldn’t let it go. What followed was research, research, and more research, and the realization that their idea could very much become a reality.

And a reality it became. Beehive Distilling opened their doors in January 2014, and quickly established themselves as a craft distillery that had two primary focuses: Make good gin, and make it look good. After 35-40 test batches, Jackrabbit Gin was created, and their popularity spread. Join us on The Utah Foodie as we sit down with Erik and Chris to discuss the history of distilling in Utah, and how gin uniquely stands out from other liquors. We’ll also dive into how their work as marketers, photographers and creatives influenced their approach to launching Beehive Distilling.

We also would like to say a special "thank you" to all of our listeners! This podcast has been a labor of love, and we're so thankful to have a community that is as excited about the Utah food scene as we are.

For more information or to browse our episode archive, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter. See you next week!

 

This episode was brought to you by: 

KRCL 90.9fm Community Radio

Vive Juicery, a Utah-based cold-pressed juicery with three locations along the Wasatch Front.

#48: Mountain West Cider – Let There Be Cider!

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We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again: the craft scene in Salt Lake City is growing at an impressive rate. With craft breweries and distilleries innovating and influencing the quality of beverage we enjoy in Utah, it’s apparent that Utahans are eager to support and enjoy locally made products. 

Despite the popularity of craft brewing and distilleries, Utah has a very obvious lack of cideries. Cider is the fastest growing beverage market in the country. While a lot of chatter revolves around craft brewing, the amount of cider being consumed in the US has increased by 95% in the last year alone. With the United States Association of Cider Makers established five years ago, the popularity and artisan approach of cider making has grown leaps and bounds.

Jennifer and Jeff Carleton, the owners of Mountain West Cider, are cider lovers who were unimpressed by the available mass market options . They saw the lack of cideries in Utah as a problem, and knew they had the perfect solution. While Jennifer and Jeff had toyed with the idea of potentially opening a bar or restaurant, it was always a dream that they kept on the top shelf for a later date.

But one fateful day an article about cider sparked an idea, and Jennifer and Jeff quickly realized that their dream of owning a business of their own was more possible than they realized. After years of research, planning, and searching, Jennifer and Jeff opened Mountain West Cider in November 2015 at 425 N 400 W.

Join us on this episode of The Utah Foodie as we chat with Jennifer and Jeff about their journey from cider lovers to cidery owners, and learn more about the fascinating history of cider in the US.

For more information or to browse our episode archive, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter. See you next week!

#47: The Big O Doughnuts - 100% Vegan, and Slightly Naughty

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In early 2015 Ally Curzon and her mom Jessica Curzon were driving through Salt Lake City when they were hit with a craving: they wanted a doughnut. While Utah has some fine doughnut options, none would work for the Curzon family because they are vegan -- and vegan doughnuts can be hard to come by.

It was then that a craving turned into a business idea. Ally and her mom drove home to share their new idea with Ally's 15-year-old sister, Leah, but were met with skepticism. Leah had seen her mom's last food project, a small chocolate truffle business, start with high hopes... but never get off the ground. So Leah Curzon issued her mom a challenge: "Mom, this can't be one of those things you don't follow through on."

So Jessica hit the kitchen with her daughters, working toward a perfect vegan doughnut. And when they felt they had the recipe dialed in, they rented a booth at a local farmer's market in town. They were received well, which led their doughnuts into Sugar House Coffee and a few other local coffee shops in town. With momentum, lots of passion, some newfound fans from their Farmer's Market presence, and their unique vegan doughnuts, Jessica Curzon put a new commercial kitchen on a credit card and went all in, rising to meet her daughter's challenge.

Today we're joined by Jessica Curzon, her 15-year-old daughter Leah Curzon, and Jessica's boyfriend and business partner Zak Farrington, to talk about their journey starting an all-vegan doughnut shop and their upcoming new location at 171 E Broadway in downtown Salt Lake City, where they'll open in just a few weeks.

For more information or to browse our episode archive, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter. See you next week!

#46: Beltex Meats – Sustainability Through Local Sourcing

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How we shop for our food has drastically changed over the decades. Originally, each neighborhood offered their local butcher, baker, and growers that offered a variety of seasonal fairs. You knew who you were buying your food from, and dinners were dictated by what could be grown in your region.

As trade increased, transportation improved, and growing methods underwent a radical shift, how we shopped underwent a revolution. No matter the season, all foodstuffs could be found. You no longer knew who was behind the meat and bread counter, and the expertise of our local neighborhood providers became difficult to find.

This lack of personal attention to our food and our shopping is, fortunately, being balanced out by the growing trend of bringing support and attention back to our local providers. With farmers markets blossoming and local stores popping up that cater to individual neighborhoods, the personalization and quality of the food we buy is improving. Nowhere can this be found more abundantly than Beltex Meats, a local butcher shop located at 511 E 900 S.

Founded by Philip Grubisa in 2014, Beltex Meats is a whole animal butcher shop that has one goal in mind: bringing back the neighborhood butcher. Only using animals from local farmers, Philip and his small team make sure that nothing goes to waste. From steak, chops, ground beef, sausages, pot pies, charcuterie boards, and dog treats, Beltex Meats is a butcher shop that brings expertise and sustainability to every product they hand craft.

Join us as we sit down with Philip and learn about the exciting professional and personal adventure he has experienced, and how his childhood led to his love of all things salted meats.

For more information or to browse our episode archive, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter. See you next week!

#45: Watchtower Cafe – The Idea That Never Went Away

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Salt Lake City has a secret. It’s full of nerds. Tabletop games, cosplaying, cons, comics, geeky podcasts. Hell, we were even voted one of the nerdiest states in the country. The amount of accessibility to various geeky interests is growing, and what was once an underground and mocked culture has risen to the top of the pop culture pile. It’s now hip to be a nerd.

For Cori Hoekstra and Mike Tuiasoa, geekdom wasn’t a trend. It was a lifestyle. With strong roots in the Salt Lake City geek community, Cori and Mike were more than aware of the communities needs. With Cori’s background in coffee houses and restaurant management, and Mike’s desire to have ownership of a project, their shared dream of having freedom to create something on their own motivated them to look for opportunities. How could they tie their comic book and literature interests into a business? How could they provide an authentic experience that rang true to who they are, and to the community they are so proudly part of?

What began as a dream very quickly took shape into Watchtower Cafe, a coffee shop that provides an encompassing experience for all coffee shop customers, but also provides a space tailored for their nerdy and geeky guests looking for a space to gather. With high-quality coffee, delicious food, and a large, comfortable space to relax, Watchtower Cafe is more than meets the eye.

Join us for this week's entertaining and inspiring episode, as we dive into the short history of Watchtower Cafe, a unique coffee/hangout/event spot that brings a unique flavor to the growing Salt Lake City coffee scene.

For more information or to browse our episode archive, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter. See you next week!

#44: Bar X and Beer Bar – Old Bar, New Tricks

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Prior to 2010, if you mentioned Bar X to a Salt Lake City resident, a very particular image came to mind: dive bar, cheap beer, no women allowed (until 1986, that is). It wouldn’t necessarily be considered a downtown hot spot that locals and visitors flocked to. But when Bar X went up for sale, a very ambitious group had a vision for what Downtown Salt Lake City could be, and knew that a revamped Bar X was the starting point.

This new group of owners, with Richard Noel and Duncan Burrell at the forefront, were inspired by the craft beer and cocktail communities growing in New York City and Los Angeles, and wanted to bring the Portland feel to the growing Salt Lake City community. This marriage of ideas led to Bar X opening as one of the first hand crafted cocktail bars in Salt Lake City. Immediately locals flocked to the new bar, and word spread quickly. With a staff full of cocktail connoisseurs and a creative energy that flows throughout the entire space, Bar X threw down the gauntlet for all future development downtown.

After an incredibly successful launch and initial few years, Richard and Duncan’s love for craft brewing developed into Beer Bar, a beer centric bar that offers the widest beer selection in the state, perfectly paired with a sausage menu that is locally made and bursting with flavor. With very distinct vibes and different offerings, Bar X and Beer Bar work in tandem to provide a variety of experiences all within close proximity.

Six years later, Bar X and it’s attached sister, Beer Bar, have introduced a new vibe and quality of nightlife that was a first in Salt Lake City. With hand-crafted cocktails made of high-quality ingredients and fresh squeezed juice, these two downtown staples jumpstarted a revitalization for the cocktail and beer scene in Salt Lake City.

Join us as we sit down with Richard Noel, Duncan Burrell, and Jeff Barnard as they tell us the fascinating story behind these two popular destinations, and how their vision and passion led to the creation of these unique bars.

#43: Uinta Brewing Company – It All Comes Back To The Beer

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Uinta Brewing Company opened their doors in 1993 with the sole focus on craft brewing – no pubs or bars, just outstanding beer. Salt Lake City wasn’t known as a brewing mecca, and previous breweries had all opened with a restaurant attached. To outsiders it seemed like co-founders Will Hamill and Dell Vance were taking a big risk. But they had an ace up their sleeve: they knew how to make really, really good beer.

What originally began as Great Basin Brewing took root in a rented out mechanical shop with three primary beers. Cutthroat, Golden Spike, and Kings Peak. These three “founding beers” helped Uinta grow throughout the local Salt Lake City and Utah market, and led to a slow and steady expansion.

In 2010, the craft brew market exploded. What was originally a hobby and passion for a small niche of the beer drinking market suddenly became a national obsession, and Uinta’s shadow loomed over the competition. They were in the craft brew market before such a market truly existed, and they had the skill, expertise, and consistency to show how craft beer was meant to be done. 23 years, 30 or so beers, and thousands of stores later, Uinta Brewing Company has grown to be the 38th largest craft brewing company in the country. 

Will Hamill joins us on the podcast today to share the passionate and unique beginnings of Uinta Brewing Company. His love for the environment and flavorful brews have led to a sustainably run company that operates within strict Utah liquor laws with a swift and nimble creativity. Join us. 

For more information or to browse our episode archive, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter. See you next week!

#42: Chapul – Eat Crickets For A Better Future

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Patrick Crowley doesn’t have a typical start in the food industry. With a background in water conservation, a majority of Patrick’s professional career was dedicated to hydrology and analyzing water resources. This passion led to the discovery of a TED talk by Marcel Dicke titled “Why Not Eat Insects?” This talk ignited a thought in Patrick’s head that couldn’t be squashed. Was there a more sustainable way to get our protein?

The majority of our water consumption goes to agriculture. Whether it’s growing the crops to feed livestock, or water going to the livestock themselves, over 70% of the water we consume is put into food. As a water conservationist, Patrick of course saw a lot of room for improvement. And with Marcel’s TED Talk fresh on his mind, Patrick set out to experiment with a new food source: crickets.

After years of experimenting and researching, Patrick launched Chapul in 2012. With friends pitching in to develop delicious recipes, Chapul entered the market with some of the first ever energy bars composed solely of crickets. As you can imagine, reactions were mixed. After some initial hesitation, local grocers and consumers saw the profit (and flavor) of these cricket energy bars, and Chapul began to make an impression at the Downtown Farmer’s Market and in markets in Colorado, California, and Utah.

And then, in 2014, an opportunity of a lifetime appeared. Patrick and Chapul were selected to participate in Shark Tank, to pitch to some of the most famous angel investors in the world. With only a few years of experience under his belt, Patrick’s passion and Chapul’s delicious bars were a massive hit, and Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban became an investor.

Join us as we sit down with Patrick and learn about the incredible journey Chapul has undergone, and how their mission to create a sustainable alternative to our agricultural system has a very bright, and flavorful, future.

For more information or to browse our episode archive, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter. See you next week!

#41: Manoli's – A New Restaurant Reinventing Greek Food, One Small Plate at a Time

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If you were to ask an out-of-state visitor what they know about Salt Lake City, they typically default to a few stock answers. Mormonism, Jello, and snow. What many are surprised to learn about is the large and vibrant Greek community that fills the area with art, culture, and delicious food. One such restaurant is Manoli's, a new Greek restaurant that is quickly changing the game for finer Greek cuisine.

You could almost say that Manoli Katsanevas was destined to be a restaurant owner. Growing up he washed and bussed tables at Crown Burgers, the restaurant his family owns and operates that is a staple in the Salt Lake City skyline. After attending culinary school and working at Cafe Niche and Fresco, the idea of creating something on his own began to tickle at Manoli's mind.

Along with his wife Katrina Cutrubus, Manoli started Manoli's Catering. Manoli and Katrina challenged themselves with diving into a variety of cuisines, whether it was casual tailgate food or high-end, plated meals. And while they constantly created and innovated, they stuck true to a few key principles. Fresh ingredients, simple techniques, with a focus on bringing flavor and freshness to the forefront.

These principles guided them, and eventually manifested into Manoli's, a Greek Small Plate Restaurant that opened in September of 2015. Going to their Greek roots, Manoli's offers a high-end Greek dining experience that truly highlights the unique Greek culture one finds in Salt Lake City. With an emphasis on community, sharing, freshness and simplicity, Manoli's brings a much needed Greek dining experience to the area.

Join us as we learn about the journey Manoli and Katrina have taken, and the inspiration and love that went into developing this new neighborhood staple.

For more information or to browse our episode archive, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter. See you next week!

 

#40: Naked Fish Japanese Bistro – The Flavor is in the Details

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When thinking about high-quality, fresh sushi, a restaurant in Utah doesn’t immediately jump to mind. But Johnny Kwon, one of the founders and the owner of Naked Fish Japanese Bistro, is working to dispel that assumption. High-quality, authentic sushi can be found in Salt Lake City, and it will change your expectations about what sushi, and Japanese cuisine, can be.

Before Naked Fish Japanese Bistro arrived on the Salt Lake City food scene in 2009, the Latitude Group owned and operated numerous restaurants throughout Salt Lake City, Park City, and the Wasatch front. Mikado, the first Japanese restaurant in the state, was under their umbrella. After a series of unfortunate legal issues, Mikado and the Latitude Group went under. What was left in the wake were some of the top chefs in the state, and a hole that needed to be filled.

Johnny Kwon and his business partners took on the challenge, and Naked Fish Japanese Bistro was born. Their goal and focus was to  put authentic Japanese cuisine and high-quality food as a priority in all of their decisions. With Akane Nakamura serving as Executive Chef and Sunny Tsogbadrakh as Executive Sushi Chef, Naked Fish places an emphasis on quality and attention to detail both in the front, and back, of the restaurant.

Join us as we learn about the detailed sourcing that goes into the food, beverages, and preparation of every item at Naked Fish, as well as the tips and tricks to eat sushi like a pro.

For more information or to browse our episode archive, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on Facebook,Instagram, or Twitter. See you next week!

#39: Beehive Cheese – Have Your Cheese and Eat it Too

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When life gives you an opportunity, you have two choices. Either ignore it, or go all in. For Pat Ford, life's opportunity came in the form of a mid-life crisis. After a successful career as a real estate developer, the energy and excitement that came from his job began to disappear. The constant pressure of deadlines, demanding bosses and commuting kept adding up, and Pat was in need of a change.

After words of encouragement from his brother-in-law, Tim Welsh, Pat took the plunge and left his job. With only family and self-funding to support their mission, Pat and Tim dove into the world of artisanal cheese making. After years of hard-work, creativity, and a little risk taking, what arose was Beehive Cheese Co. Crafted in Northern Utah, Beehive Cheese Co sources all local ingredients to create their creamy and unique cheeses. With an emphasis on high-quality and natural ingredients, every step of the cheese making process is thoughtfully planned to bring the local flavor to the forefront.

While Pat and Tim made zero income for the first two years of Beehive Cheese Co's existence, the awards and raving customer reviews were proof enough that they had found what they were meant to do. What followed were numerous awards, state-wide distribution, and a growing company that continues to create innovative and delicious artisan cheese.

Join us as we sit down with Pat Ford, and get an in-depth look into what has become Beehive Cheese Co. Full of inspiration and life-lessons, all of us can find a piece of ourselves in this story.

For more information or to browse our episode archive, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. See you next week!