Beer

#72: Fisher Brewing Company – "We're Beer Guys Who Wanted to Make a Beer Place"

#72: Fisher Brewing Company – "We're Beer Guys Who Wanted to Make a Beer Place"

Fisher Brewing Company has a storied history and one few Utah establishments rival. In fact, the brewery out-dates our state itself, having opened a decade before Utah was founded in 1896. 

A. Fisher Brewing Company’s story began in 1884, named after its entrepreneurial founder, Albert Fisher. But beer and life were different in the late 1800's. Craft beer wasn't yet a twinkle in Salt Lake City's eye, and it was rare for a company to grow beyond a few employees. Fisher Brewing smashed through both norms, employing over 200 employees and producing more than 75,000 barrels per year.

#65: Epic Brewing Company – Packaging Experiences In A Bottle

#65: Epic Brewing Company – Packaging Experiences In A Bottle

When Epic Brewing Company opened their doors in 2010 they offered a unique craft beer that was a little hard to find in other areas in the state. They sold a high alcohol content beer in 220z bottles, and were empowered by new liquor laws that allowed them to sell product directly from the brewery. Their goal then, and still today, was to turn craft brewing on its head. And indeed they have.

#44: Bar X and Beer Bar – Old Bar, New Tricks

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Prior to 2010, if you mentioned Bar X to a Salt Lake City resident, a very particular image came to mind: dive bar, cheap beer, no women allowed (until 1986, that is). It wouldn’t necessarily be considered a downtown hot spot that locals and visitors flocked to. But when Bar X went up for sale, a very ambitious group had a vision for what Downtown Salt Lake City could be, and knew that a revamped Bar X was the starting point.

This new group of owners, with Richard Noel and Duncan Burrell at the forefront, were inspired by the craft beer and cocktail communities growing in New York City and Los Angeles, and wanted to bring the Portland feel to the growing Salt Lake City community. This marriage of ideas led to Bar X opening as one of the first hand crafted cocktail bars in Salt Lake City. Immediately locals flocked to the new bar, and word spread quickly. With a staff full of cocktail connoisseurs and a creative energy that flows throughout the entire space, Bar X threw down the gauntlet for all future development downtown.

After an incredibly successful launch and initial few years, Richard and Duncan’s love for craft brewing developed into Beer Bar, a beer centric bar that offers the widest beer selection in the state, perfectly paired with a sausage menu that is locally made and bursting with flavor. With very distinct vibes and different offerings, Bar X and Beer Bar work in tandem to provide a variety of experiences all within close proximity.

Six years later, Bar X and it’s attached sister, Beer Bar, have introduced a new vibe and quality of nightlife that was a first in Salt Lake City. With hand-crafted cocktails made of high-quality ingredients and fresh squeezed juice, these two downtown staples jumpstarted a revitalization for the cocktail and beer scene in Salt Lake City.

Join us as we sit down with Richard Noel, Duncan Burrell, and Jeff Barnard as they tell us the fascinating story behind these two popular destinations, and how their vision and passion led to the creation of these unique bars.

#43: Uinta Brewing Company – It All Comes Back To The Beer

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Uinta Brewing Company opened their doors in 1993 with the sole focus on craft brewing – no pubs or bars, just outstanding beer. Salt Lake City wasn’t known as a brewing mecca, and previous breweries had all opened with a restaurant attached. To outsiders it seemed like co-founders Will Hamill and Dell Vance were taking a big risk. But they had an ace up their sleeve: they knew how to make really, really good beer.

What originally began as Great Basin Brewing took root in a rented out mechanical shop with three primary beers. Cutthroat, Golden Spike, and Kings Peak. These three “founding beers” helped Uinta grow throughout the local Salt Lake City and Utah market, and led to a slow and steady expansion.

In 2010, the craft brew market exploded. What was originally a hobby and passion for a small niche of the beer drinking market suddenly became a national obsession, and Uinta’s shadow loomed over the competition. They were in the craft brew market before such a market truly existed, and they had the skill, expertise, and consistency to show how craft beer was meant to be done. 23 years, 30 or so beers, and thousands of stores later, Uinta Brewing Company has grown to be the 38th largest craft brewing company in the country. 

Will Hamill joins us on the podcast today to share the passionate and unique beginnings of Uinta Brewing Company. His love for the environment and flavorful brews have led to a sustainably run company that operates within strict Utah liquor laws with a swift and nimble creativity. Join us. 

For more information or to browse our episode archive, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter. See you next week!

#31: "An Evening Out in SLC" - Food Tips With Foodies

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Welcome to The Utah Foodie! On today’s episode we bring in two of our state's top food writers and critics to help us craft a perfect night out on the town exploring Salt Lake City's food scene.

This is our third installment in our monthly "Food Tips With Foodies" series where we bring in local food experts and talk food for an hour on a pre-selected topic. Last month, we explored Breakfast & Brunch in Utah with Chris Holified of I Am Salt Lake and Chelsea Nelson of Heartbeat Nosh. In October, we brought in Amanda Rock of Amanda Eats SLC and Jeffrey Steadman from Yelp.com to talk Fine Dining options around the state.

Today we’re on with Kathy Stephenson and Heather King:

Kathy Stephenson has been The Tribune food writer since 2000, covering all aspects of eating including dining, alcohol and agriculture. A Utah native, she began working at The Tribune in 1982 while a student at the University of Utah. She honed her journalism skills covering various topics including communities, education and (fun fact) Figure Skating during the 2002 Winter Olympics.

Heather King is a food writer and restaurant critic for The Salt Lake Tribune, Devour Utah, Downtown SLC magazine and Examiner.com. She is the co-founder of The Utah Review where she writes about arts, culture, food and travel. She is the founder of Utah's Ladies Who Lunch groups, a member of the Association of Food Journalists and a proud Great Dane owner.

For more episodes and information, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter.

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#8: Avenues Proper - Andrew Tendick & Liam Connelly talk craft beer, great patios, and good food.

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Avenues Proper: A staple for those in the Avenues neighborhood... and a worthy destination for those who aren't. Nestled up on 376 8th Ave, it’s quaint, it’s friendly, and they serve up great craft beer with an equally impressive food menu. And in our opinion, they’ve got one of the best patios around in the summertime.

In this episode we talk about Utah’s smallest craft brewery, their food, and their history with Liam Connelly and Andrew Tendick — two of the owners behind Avenues Proper. Tune in.

Avenues Proper

376 8th Ave, Suite C

SLC, UT 84103

385-227-8628

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#4: Squatters - Doug Hofeling, A history of Utah's purveyor in craft brewing & eco-friendly food.

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Today on The Utah Foodie, our host Chase Murdock talks with the man behind Squatters: COO and General Manager, Doug Hofeling. Since quietly opening their doors on Broadway in 1989, Squatters has become a Utah staple in the restaurant and brewing scene. But when co-founders Peter Cole and Jeff Polychronis were getting started, their intentions were simple: they just wanted great beer, a friendly atmosphere, and a culture focused on quality, their community, and the environment.

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Squatters has always been successful, but the last five years have been explosive. In 2012 they announced a merging with their friendly competitor, Greg Shirf at Wasatch Beers, and the Utah Brewers Cooperative -- a massive brewing and bottling operation in South Salt Lake. They were also acquired by Firemen Capital Partners, a private equity group in Boston who wanted to invest in the craft brewing business and help Squatters and Wasatch combine and expand.

Today, Squatters boasts five high-volume brew pubs in Utah and ships bottled craft beer to 16 states. They've been listed as one of the Top 50 craft brewers in the country and hold 17 World Beer Cup awards, which is a feat only two other brewers in the US can also claim. As Squatters continues to expand and receive recognition for quality beer, many in our state feel they are representing Utah and shattering our historic reputation of not appreciating a great brew.

Importantly, Squatters has been able to maintain its commitment to a triple bottom line philosophy of People, Planet, Profit, that drives an emphasis on investing in the community as well as eco-friendly, ethical, and healthy food.

Join us in this episode as we further explore all of this and get to know Doug Hofeling, the man at the helm of this reinvented craft-brewing leader.

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Squatters' Website >> http://squatters.com/

Wasatch's Website >> https://www.wasatchbeers.com/

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#1: Whiskey Street - A chat with Jason LeCates & Matt Crandall, the two behind the successful downtown bar & restaurant

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Today we interview two of the gentlemen behind Whiskey Street: owner and proprietor Jason LeCates, and executive chef Matt Crandall. After launching Bourbon House in 2011, Matt and Jason set out to do it again. But this time they had more funding, a better location, and a drive to create an upscale whiskey bar that boasts a great drink menu and a strong food offering.

On opening day, Matt and Jason were scrambling to find plates and make sure they were prepared for the a crowd they hoped would come. And boy, did the crowd come. The response was explsoive, and today Whiskey Street is one of Salt Lake's busiest bars and whether it's lunch time, happy hour, or late-night drinks, there's always a crowd looking to sample their appetizers or try one of their craft cocktails and 130+ whiskies.

In this episode we talk about Whiskey Street's first name ("Order 44"), how they created their menu, and what it's like to run a bar in Utah. We discuss UT liquor laws, Whiskey Street's "ahi tartini" appetizer, and their future plans for growth.

Subscribe and listen in! And for more info, visit theutahfoodie.com or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter.

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